Science Communication Workshops, 2019-2020

The goal of this workshop series is to educate the Penn scientific community on how to communicate their work— and the work of other scientist— to all audiences, from peers and experts to the general public. Just as people communicate every day through many mediums, science communication is found on many mediums, ranging from tweets to published articles and everything in between. This series will teach participants how to use them all, with confidence, to help spread scientific knowledge and understanding.

Scientific Storytelling

September 17, 2019

12:15pm-1:45pm

JMEC 516EW (5th fl Smilow Center for Translational Research, West Pavilion)
3400 Civic Center Blvd, Philadelphia, PA 19104

Making your science a story

Humans respond to stories: we’re wired for it! Rafael E. Luna, author of “The Art of Scientific Storytelling” will discuss how to frame your science as a story for your audience. He will cover how to use literary tools to create a story arch, and how to weave your story into a conversation. This workshop will be 1.5 hrs, and will include group exercises to teach you how to reduce jargon, reduce distracting and unnecessary details, build confidence with an audience, and improve active listening skills. The optional take-home exercise will help you practice storytelling on your own. The food provided will be pizza!

 

Data Visualization

October/time TBA

Location TBA

Explaining your data through images

Who is speaking, what they’re speaking out, how long the event will be, what exercises we’ll do, what homework there will be.

 

explaining your science through Slides and posters

Presentation programs (like PowerPoint) provide a slide design that is antithetical to audience understanding. This workshop teaches design principles backed by research on the psychology and neuroscience of multimedia learning. In addition to getting hands on practice with these design principles, you will learn to manage your audience's attention between you and your slides, and create engaging presentations that can stand alone.

Presentation Skills

November/time TBA

Location TBA

 

Communicating Your Work Through Manuscript- and Grant-Writing

Who is speaking, what they’re speaking out, how long the event will be, what exercises we’ll do, what homework there will be.

Scientific Writing

January/time TBA

Location TBA

 

Using Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook to Communicate Science

Who is speaking, what they’re speaking out, how long the event will be, what exercises we’ll do, what homework there will be.

Social Media

February/time TBA

Location TBA

 

Science Writing for Newspapers, Blogs, and Websites

Who is speaking, what they’re speaking out, how long the event will be, what exercises we’ll do, what homework there will be.

Online Writing

March/time TBA

Location TBA

 

USing podcasts and videos to communicate science

Who is speaking, what they’re speaking out, how long the event will be, what exercises we’ll do, what homework there will be.

Podcasts and Videos

April/time TBA

Location TBA

 

Science Communication: how to Get people to listen to you

This workshop will cover aspects of science communication which are unique to the field. For example, how do you communicate risk and uncertainty to a non-scientific audience? How do you address controversial and emotional topics like GMOs, fetal tissue research, vaccines, and climate change? Expect a discussion of this and more, including hands-on exercises to teach storytelling techniques and to help participants understand how perceptions can differ between audience members hearing the same information. The optional take-home assignment will involve using scientific anecdotes to humanize and illustrate points made in a short talk.

Science-Specific Communication

May/time TBA

Location TBA